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 We are constantly uploading and organizing our images and videos of thousands of Virgin Islands species into a searchable library and database.

It is our goal to create the most comprehensive, searchable, up-to-date, accurate, open and independent citizen scientist archive of the life and Eco-system of the Virgin Islands.

We started this library project in February 2017 and will be adding species at a rate of two to three per week. Expect limited species search functionality over the near term as species are added. Use our “Subscribe Service” in the upper right hand column to be notified when we post new species.

SPECIES IDENTIFICATION CAVEAT

HOW TO USE THE CCVI FISH AND WILDLIFE LIBRARY

The Fish and Wildlife section is continually being populated with species and is intended for local observational research and identification purposes. Reports are of species observation and behavior in the Virgin Islands through our research and thus may be different than general publications that average data from global reports. Along the tenants of ‘Think Globally, Act Locally’ this section deals with the local uniqueness and diversity of, and within, island species. New species are being added all the time as we work towards creating a comprehensive Virgin Islands Fish and Wildlife Identification System.

To use our library, simply input a common or scientific name in the search bar at the top right corner of any page.

You can also click on the “LIFE/KINGDOMS” box below to manually click through to a page-by-page Kingdom structure of a life form using the Carl Woese method for top level classification and the Carolus Linnaeus System (KPCOFGS).

LIFE
ARCHAEA | BACTERIA | EUKARYA
KINGDOMS

How our life pages are organized:

Keep Ponds Clean Or Frogs Get Sick

Dead frog found drowned in littered plastic water bottle. 🙁

‘Keep ponds clean or frogs get sick’ is a simple mnemonic you can use to remember how all life is organized: Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus and Species.

This is also how our wildlife identification pages on this site are indexed, categorized and site mapped.

A Swedish gentleman known by his Latin name of Carolus Linnaeus was quite fond of plants. He loved to sort, label and identify specimens. However, in his day, way back in the 18th century, no one had yet taken the time to properly classify plants. As a zoologist, botanist and physician he was becoming quite frustrated trying to catalogue over 100 new plant species he’d discovered. So, in 1753, six years before Charles Darwin published “On the Origin of Species {abv.}”1, Dr. Linnaeus introduced the world to his own system of organizing plants called “binomial nomenclature”2. In 1758 he published the 10th edition of Systema Naturae, cataloging all life into two-part names.

Using binomial nomenclature, all life is given a two part scientific name based upon Genus and species. For example, humans are Homo sapiens. Our Genus is “Homo”, Latin for ‘man’ which includes all others in the Family Hominidae such as the Neanderthal. Our species “sapiens“, is Latin for ‘wise’. We are the only surviving member of the Genus Homo.

Dr. Linnaeus’ system of organizing life is still used by scientists today. It is literally a ‘living system’ as scientists are continually tweaking and slightly revising it as we discover more and more about organisms on our planet.

 

TAXONOMY OF SEARCHES

This site top-level classifies organisms under the Carl Woese three domain system defined in 1990.

Woese postulates that all organisms exist in one of three super domains: Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya.  Archaea and Bacteria subsist of single-celled organisms lacking a nucleus. Most other multi-cellular life and all life with a nucleus and membrane-bound organelles are Eukarya (that’s us … humans). For the purposes of this site, the super domains are considered ‘silent’ or ‘understood’ and we jump directly to Kindoms for classification sorting. Utilizing the Linnaeus’ system, ‘Keep Ponds Clean Or Frogs Get Sick’, you can easily locate and identify any Virgin Islands organism listed in our growing database whether you know its species name or not.

 

HOW TO SEARCH OR IDENTIFY SPECIES WITH CLIMATE CHANGE VI

A basic understanding of the life classification methodology can help you get more out of your Identification experience. You may first wish to review this simple primer of life classifications from Mensa: Kingdom Animalia

 

Icon Search: ClimateChangeVi’s Iconic system of locating site life is fairly intuitive.

Click the Super Domain-Kindoms link at the top of the Fish and Wildlife page.

This will open the Kingdoms page where you will select the appropriate Kingdom Icon. From there you will continue to receive sub classification options with images until you arrive at the species you are trying to identify.

Search Bar:

The Search Bar is located at the top right corner of each webpage and represented by a magnifying glass icon. Simply enter species name in Latin (Genus species); or English Common

 

SEARCH USING OUR URL:

To assist with identification of organisms partially known to you, the taxonomic structure can be entered into your web browser in Latin. Alternatively English or Common Names can be used to narrow down a species search from the Genus level.

Always start with: http://www.ClimateChangeVI.org/

Continue entering the target species’ suspected classifications in order: /kingdom/phylum/class/order/family/genus/species (Replace underlined italics with the Latin names of the life form you are trying to identify; Common name can be used for Genus and species).

Do not skip a classification. You may stop at the last classification you know and a page will load providing pictorial or descriptive options to choose from to further narrow down your search. For instance, if you know the kingdom, phylum and class only, you can enter the web address: http://www.ClimateChangeVI.org/fish-and-wildlife/kingdom/phylum/class/

Alternatively, perhaps you know only the family, genus or species. Any of the three bottom levels may be entered as a web address. http://www.ClimateChangeVI.org/fish-and-wildlife/family; http://www.ClimateChangeVI.org/fish-and-wildlife/genus; or http://www.ClimateChangeVI.org/fish-and-wildlife/species

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1Charles Darwin, “On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life,” 1859
2Carolus Linnaeus (Carolus von Linné, Carl von Linné), “Species Plantarum,” 1853